IARPA in the News

The Atlantic

As investigators try to figure out what happened today during the bombings at the Boston Marathon, they'll turn to video taken at the scene of the explosions.

In addition to any closed-circuit television cameras lining Boylston Street and its surroundings, The Bureau Chief of Public Information, Cheryl Fiandaca, called for members of the public to send in video from near the finish line.

Once the police have the prospective evidence in hand, they'll need to run forensic analysis on it....Right now, there is no video software that can do this type of analysis, not even in a first-pass way. IARPA (DARPA for the intelligence services) put out a call for proposals in 2010 for this kind of "Automated Low-level Analysis and Description of Diverse Intelligence Video." It described, in brief, the problem that investigators (or intelligence analysts) face...

HPCWire

The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) is putting out some RFI feelers in hopes of pushing new boundaries with an HPC program. However, at the core of their evaluation process is an overt dismissal of current popular benchmarks, including floating operations per second (FLOPS).

Deep Dive Intel

The intelligence community’s research shop wants to see if DNA, lightwaves or other phenomena can be harnessed into computers that would rip through big data sets dramatically faster than today’s machines or those on the horizon.

Scientists in the U.S. and abroad have until April 5 to chime in about their work and its potential relevance to intelligence problems. IARPA released the “Novel Technologies for High Performance Computing” request for information on March 8.

New York Times

In 2006, Philip E. Tetlock published a landmark book called “Expert Political Judgment.” While his findings obviously don’t apply to me, Tetlock demonstrated that pundits and experts are terrible at making predictions.

Military & Aerospace Electronics

Government computer scientists are asking industry for information that could lead to new levels of computational performance with dramatically lower power, space, and cooling requirements than the high-performance computing (HPC) systems of today.

Science Magazine

In a world overwhelmed by increasing amounts of data, finding new ways to store and process information has become a necessity. Conventional silicon-based electronics has experienced rapid and steady growth, thanks to the progressive miniaturization of its basic component, the transistor, but that trend cannot continue indefinitely.

R&D Magazine

Recently, Science Magazine invited JQI fellow Chris Monroe and Duke Professor Jungsang Kim to speculate on ion trap technology as a scalable option for quantum information processing. The article is highlighted on the cover of this week’s (March 8, 2013) issue, which is dedicated to quantum information. The cover portrays a photograph of a surface trap that was fabricated by Sandia National Labs and used to trap ions at JQI and Duke, among other laboratories.