IARPA in the News

Raytheon

Advances in genetic manipulation have raised the possibility of a new kind of attack on our food supply. ... The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity is sponsoring the FELIX program to develop a set of tools that would help us tell the difference between a naturally occurring pathogen and one that was engineered to cause harm.

 

Press Release

The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), within the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, today announced the UG2+ Prize Challenge, a competition that leverages a unique computer vision dataset of unmanned aerial vehicle, glider, and ground (UG2) data.

 

Press Release

WASHINGTON – The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, within the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, announced today the launch of the Ithildin program to develop new sorbent capabilities for sample collection, large area protection, and “smart” filters.

 

Federal News Network

The intelligence community, like every other federal and private sector organization, suffers from the common employee disease of “linkclickitis.” It’s described by doctors as a condition where the employee has an uncontrollable urge to press the left button on the mouse while hovering over a link sent by email. But the good doctors, err developers, from the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Agency may have found a cure or at least a way to isolate the disease so it doesn’t do harm to the rest of the body.

fedscoop

What’s the best method for determining whether or not someone is trustworthy? Given the choice, should we trust a thorough background check, a polygraph, or a simple gut-check? These questions take on special significance in an era when the trustworthiness of the media, public figures and more is increasingly fraught. And these are the questions that the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) is trying to answer through a new public challenge.

 

Government CIO

In a near-future world of self-driving cars, delivery drones and even machine-piloted passenger planes whizzing about in a tidy, efficient metropolis, it’s not hard to imagine a scenario where one or more (or all) of the machines suddenly go haywire... The Intelligence Community’s research arm has one idea about how something like that can happen.

 

fedscoop

The most serious attack on an artificial intelligence system may not come from malware but rather from a single sticky note. ... Officials from the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) are looking for a software package that could help thwart such a scenario, known as Trojan or backdoor attack, and are reaching out to industry for help.