IARPA in the News

NextGov

The connected system known as the internet of things might soon include human employees as part of its network. ... Deniz Ones and Mustafa al'Absi, professors of psychology and behavioral medicine, respectively, are part of a team from six universities developing out mPerf, a $13.8 million effort to use sensors and software to examine employee behavior. That program is part of the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, the intelligence community's research and development unit, and its Multimodal Objective Sensing to Assess Individuals with Context project, known as MOSAIC for short.

 

Faribault Daily News

If a FitBit can make us better at working out, maybe it can make us better at working, too. That’s the basic premise behind a nationwide study looking at work performance using wearables, smartphones and other technology that can track responses to different tasks.

 

Scientific American

When Jason Matheny joined the U.S. Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) as a program manager in 2009, he made a habit of chatting to the organization’s research analysts. “What do you need?” he would ask, and the answer was always the same: a way to make more accurate predictions.

Computer History Museum

Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) was created in 2006 to advance the development of research and technology used to achieve the intelligence goals of the United States (US) and “avoid technological surprise.”

University of Minnesota News

Mobile sensors for workplace productivity? Activity trackers for meetings? It’s the future of mobile sensor technology and two University of Minnesota faculty are making it possible, ushering in a new era of productivity and efficiency in the workplace.

 

Semiconductor Engineering

The semiconductor industry continues to move full speed ahead with traditional chip scaling. There are several challenges in the arena. One of the big but lessor known challenges is metrology. Metrology, the science of characterizing and measuring films and structures, is becoming more complex, challenging and expensive at each node. Looking to solve some major problems in the metrology arena, the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) recently announced an effort to develop metrology tools that could image current and future chips at a faster rate.

 

C4ISRNET

Officials from the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, or IARPA, say they hope the organization’s new Face Recognition Prize Challenge will help them move the needle on biometric security. They expect to start judging soon a range of new technologies submitted for consideration, with a winner to be announced in October.