IARPA in the News

Nextgov

The U.S. Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity wants to develop a hand-held, laser-based remote sensor that could detect and identify chemical weapons, explosives, narcotics and potentially even biological agents – all from up to 100 feet away.

WashingtonExec

The U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, announced that LGS Innovations will be one of four performers chosen to develop the system for the U.S. Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). The contract is in support of IARPA’s Standoff Illuminator for Measuring Absorbance and Reflective Infrared Light Signatures (SILMARILS) project.

Business Wire

The U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, announced that LGS Innovations will be one of four performers chosen to develop the system for the U.S. Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). The contract is in support of IARPA’s Standoff Illuminator for Measuring Absorbance and Reflective Infrared Light Signatures (SILMARILS) project.

Spectrum

Researchers have traced the paths of thousands of neurons in a tiny piece of mouse brain, creating the largest map of neuronal wiring to date....The work is a small part of a mammoth, federally funded project called MICrONS, for Machine Intelligence from Cortical Networks.

Honeywell - Aerospace

Honeywell has been working on an IARPA Strengthening Human Adaptive Reasoning and Problem solving (SHARP) funded project, in partnership with Oxford, Harvard and Northeastern University, to investigate the potential to increase intelligence, using combination of cognitive training, and mild electrical stimulation to boost the activity of brain activity engaged by the training activity.

The Washington Post

The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) within the Office of the Director of National Intelligence was created to coordinate the high-risk, high-reward research programs that tackle some of the intelligence community’s most difficult problems. Because of the uncertainty inherent in its work, most of the projects have a “less than 50 percent probability of success,” according to IARPA’s director. To mitigate risk, the team builds what they call “incremental gates” – stopping points...

Quanta

An ambitious new program, funded by the federal government’s intelligence arm, aims to bring artificial intelligence more in line with our own mental powers. Three teams composed of neuroscientists and computer scientists will attempt to figure out how the brain performs these feats of visual identification, then make machines that do the same. “Today’s machine learning fails where humans excel,” said Jacob Vogelstein, who heads the program at the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).