IARPA in the News 2015

 

Foreign Policy

In 2014, the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, or IARPA, a research organization that develops cutting-edge technology for U.S. intelligence agencies, pledged $12 million to design performance-enhancing techniques, including electrical stimulation of the brain for “optimizing human adaptive reasoning”—that is, for making the analysts smarter.

Azo Optics

The Optical Society (OSA) is pleased to announce that the Logic Analysis Tool (LAT) team is the winner of the 2015 Paul F. Forman Team Engineering Excellence Award....The research team first came together in 2010 in response to a call from the Intelligence Advanced Research Program Activity (IARPA) for innovative solutions to circuit analysis.

FierceGovernmentIT

The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, which is part of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, said teams from the Johns Hopkins University, Raytheon BBN Technologies, the Institute for Infocomm Research, Singapore's Agency for Science, Technology and Research, or A*STAR, and Brno University of Technology in the Czech Republic will share the $110,000 prize, in a press release.

Harvard Business Review

So what is the secret to making better forecasts? From 1984 to 2004 Tetlock tracked political pundits’ ability to predict world events, culminating in his 2006 book Expert Political Judgment. He found that overall, his study subjects weren’t very good forecasters, but a subset did perform better than random chance. Those people stood out not for their credentials or ideology but for their style of thinking. They rejected the idea that any single force determines an outcome. They used multiple information sources and analytical tools and combined competing explanations for a given phenomenon. Above all, they were allergic to certainty....Superforecasting describes Tetlock’s work since. In 2011 he and his colleagues entered a prediction tournament sponsored by the U.S. government’s Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity.

Signal Magazine

Four teams will share a grand prize of $110,000 for their work on the speech recognition challenge Automatic Speech Recognition in Reverberant Environments, or ASpIRE. The winning teams are from Johns Hopkins University, Raytheon BBN Technologies, the Institute for Infocomm Research and Brno University of Technology, according to the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), within the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.