IARPA in the News 2014

FCW

Apparently, these are the droids IARPA was looking for.

The winning solution for of the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity's first public challenge contest, has the name to match the initiative.

Defense One

In February, the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) announced a rather unique competition called INSTINCT, which stands for Investigating Novel Statistical Techniques to Identify Neurophysiological Correlates of Trustworthiness. The goal was to develop “innovative algorithms that can use data from one participant to accurately predict whether their partner will make trusting decisions and/or act in a trustworthy manner.”

MIT Technology Review

....The search for ways to fight decoherence and the errors it introduces into calculations has come to dominate the field of quantum computing. For a qubit to truly be scalable, it would probably need to accidentally decohere only around once in a million operations, says Chris Monroe, a professor at the University of Maryland and co-leader of a quantum computing project funded by the Department of Defense and the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity. Today the best qubits typically decohere thousands of times that often.

FedScoop

The winners of the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity’s first-ever public challenge have created a predictive analysis tool that Yoda would be proud of.

Two members of BAE Systems’ Adaptive Reasoning Technologies Group — physicist Troy Lau and research engineer Scott Kuzdeba — won IARPA’s Investigating Novel Statistical Techniques to Identify Neurophysiological Correlates of Trustworthiness (INSTINCT) challenge by creating the “Joint Estimation of Deception Intent via Multisource Integration of Neuropsychological Discriminators” (JEDI MIND), a statistical technique that uses a person’s heart rate and reaction time to predict whether they can be trusted to follow through on a promise.

The Hill

Two researchers took home a $25,000 prize Thursday from a top spy agency for developing a system that helps predict how trustworthy people are by studying their partners.

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) announced the winners of the contest hosted by a research arm of the agency. The contest followed the introduction of a project in 2010 that sought technology and other approaches that could assess trust even under stress and deception.

The 70-day contest attracted 39 contestants and was a product of the Intelligence Advanced Research Project Activity (IARPA). The group, housed inside the DNI, focuses on what it calls “high risk, high reward” research on intelligence activities.