IARPA in the News 2014

Military & Aerospace Electronics

U.S. intelligence experts are trying come to grips with thorny issues like international arms smuggling, nuclear materials exchanges, and inter-continental illegal drug trafficking with one of today's most difficult surveillance challenges: finding and tracking foreign ships at sea....

Officials of the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Agency (IARPA) in Washington issued a request for information notice this week (IARPA-RFI-14-09) for the Maritime Tagging, Tracking, & Locating (TTL) project.

Network World

There’s a new high-tech competition afoot that challenges participants to design speech-recognition software that can decipher conversations and other speech that happens over microphones in noisy, echo-prone situations.

The $50,000 challenge comes from researchers at the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), within the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. The completion, known as Automatic Speech recognition in Reverberant Environments (ASpIRE), hopes to get the industry, universities or other researchers to build automatic speech recognition technology that can handle a variety of acoustic environments and recording scenarios on natural conversational speech.

Military & Aerospace Electronics

U.S. intelligence experts are asking industry, colleges, and the public to design speech-recognition software that can decipher conversations and other speech that happens over microphones in noisy, echo-ridden environments.

Officials of the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Agency (IARPA) in Washington are launching the Automatic Speech recognition in Reverberant Environments (ASpIRE) speech-recognition contest.

ExecutiveGov

The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Agency aims to find speech recognition software for deciphering conversations in noisy areas through a $50,000 prize challenge.

IARPA’s Automatic Speech Recognition in Reverberant Environments challenge will give participants access to sample microphone data for ASR platform testing, the agency said Tuesday.

FierceGovernmentIT

U.S. intelligence officials are seeking innovative technology that can better help them translate speech into text in various acoustic environments. And it's launching a contest to get there.

The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, or IARPA, announced a challenge Nov. 18 – called the Automatic Speech recognition in Reverberant Environments, or ASpIRE – in which participants must develop a system that can record conversational telephone speech and effectively translate far-field microphone data in noisy rooms.